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Scott Hall

Scott Hall was named for W. Kerr Scott, a governor of North Carolina. The residence hall was completed in 1951 at a cost of nearly $2 million, the largest sum appropriated to the University at that time. The red brick structure housed 1,100 male students and included 505 rooms and three apartments for faculty supervisors.

History

Scott Hall was built to relieve a housing shortage for male students. At the time there were 2,300 male students at A&T, 1,000 of whom were living in dormitories. The other 1,000 were living in World War II-era Overseas Replacement Depot (ORD) temporary barracks. The ORD was home to thousands of G.I.s over the duration of World War II as well as home to veterans returning from the War.

The building was dedicated at the June 1952 commencement program. Dr. F.D. Bluford was the President of the University at the time, H.L. Coble Construction Company was the contractor, and McMinn and Norfleet were the architects.

Scott Hall was razed on Sunday, July 11th, 2004.

A Wall with Bullet Holes

In May 1969, civil unrest in Greensboro resulted in the National Guard sweeping through A&T's campus. One wall of Scott Hall was riddled with bullets. During the unrest, A&T student Willie Grimes was shot and killed by unknown assailants and two other students were wounded.

The wall of Scott Hall with the bullet holes has been preserved as a memorial.

Scott Hall was named for W. Kerr Scott, a governor of North Carolina. It was completed in 1951 at a cost of nearly $2 million, the largest sum appropriated to the University at that time. The red brick structure housed 1,100 male students and included 505 rooms and three apartments for faculty supervisors.
Room 2128

Ezell Blair, Jr. (Jibreel Khazan) and Joe McNeil, two of the A&T Four, lived in Room 2128 of Scott Hall. Franklin McCain and David Richmond regularly met in Room 2128 with Blair and McNeil sometimes to do homework and always to discuss issues about equality and civil rights. In this room on January 31st, 1960, the plans were finalized for the historic sit-in demonstration at Woolworth's lunch counter on February 1st, 1960. The window and frame of Room 2128 are now preserved in the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in downtown Greensboro.

Other Notable Residents

Of the thousands of A&T students who have lived at Scott Hall, several are notable alumni:

  • Henry Frye, North Carolina Supreme Court Justice
  • Elvin Bethea, A&T and NFL great
  • Rev. Jesse Jackson, civil rights activist & presidential candidate
  • Jesse Jackson, Jr., Congressperson
  • Ralph Shelton, entrepreneur
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The facade of the F.D. Bluford Library at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University